For the Long Run: They Will Run and Not Grow Weary by Tim OBrien - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: Sep 23, 2015
  • Reviews: 261

Brief introduction:

This book is filled with tips on training to run a full marathon and for living a healthy, happy Christ centered life.is admittance into Harvard in favor of combat in Vietnam. The alternatives of a flight to Canada or a moral stand in a U.S. jail...

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Details of For the Long Run: They Will Run and Not Grow Weary

ISBN
9781477537572
Publication date
Age range
18+ Years
Book language
GB
Pages
80
Format
PDF, DOC, EPUB, FB3
Quality
Low quality scanned pages
Dimensions
5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.17 (d)
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Some brief overview of this book

This book is filled with tips on training to run a full marathon and for living a healthy, happy Christ centered life.

is admittance into Harvard in favor of combat in Vietnam. The alternatives of a flight to Canada or a moral stand in a U.S. jail were too unpopular. He has since explored the definitions of courage — moral, physical, political — in his fiction, a body of work that has, at least until recently, dealt almost exclusively with Americas most unpopular war and its domestic consequences. His first book, If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home looked at the war through a collection of war vignettes that he had written for newspapers in his home state of Minnesota, and his second book was a novel, Northern Lights, that he later decried as overly long and Hemingwayesque — almost a parody of the writers war stories. His third book, Going After Cacciato in 1978 does not suffer such criticism from the author. Or, for that matter, from the critics. Grace Paley praised the novel — which follows the journey of a soldier who goes AWOL from Vietnam and walks to Paris — as imaginative in The New York Times. And the book became a breakthrough critical success for OBrien, the start of a series that would give him the unofficial title as our pre-eminent Vietnam storyteller. Cacciato even won the prestigious National Book Award for fiction in 1979, beating out John Irvings The World According to Garp. Going After Cacciato taunts us with many faces and angles of vision, Catherine Calloway wrote in the 1990 book America Rediscovered: Critical Essays on Literature and Film of the Vietnam War. The protagonist Paul Berlin cannot distinguish between what is real and what is imagined in the war just as the reader cannot differentiate between what is real and what is imagined in the novel... Paul Berlin is forced, as is the reader, into an attempt to distinguish between illusion and reality and in doing so creates a continuous critical dialogue between himself and the world around him. Born in Austin, Minn., to an insurance salesman and schoolteacher, OBrien grew up as a voracious reader but didnt find the courage to write until his experiences in Vietnam. After the war, he studied at the Harvard Universitys School of Government and was a staff reporter at The Washington Post in the early 1970s. He writes from early in the morning until the evening and has a reputation for discarding long passages of writing because he finds the effort substandard. He also can do extensive revisions of his books between editions. His follow-up to Cacciato, 1981s The Nuclear Age, had a draft dodger find his fortune in the uranium business though he is consistently plagued by dreams of nuclear annihilation. Critics labeled it a misstep. But his subsequent effort, The Things They Carried, a collection of short stories about Vietnam, reaffirmed his reputation as a Vietnam observer. By moving beyond the horror of the fighting to examine with sensitivity and insight the nature of courage and fear, by questioning the role that imagination plays in helping to form our memories and our own versions of truth, he places The Things They Carried high up on the list of best fiction about any war, The New York Times said in March of 1990. And his next novel, In the Lake of the Woods, another Vietnam effort, won the top spot on Times roster of fiction for 1994. In Lake, Minnesota politician John Wade, whose career has suffered a major setback with the revelation of his participation in the notorious My Lai massacre from the Vietnam War, retreats to his cabin with wife Kathy, who later disappears. The Times Literary Supplement said it was perhaps his bleakest novel yet and that the most chilling passages are not those which deal with guns and gore in Vietnam but those set in Minnesota many years later, revealing a people at ease but never at peace. Pico Lyer, writing in Time, said OBrien manages what he does best, which is to find the boy scout in the foot soldier, and the foot soldier in every reader. OBriens more recent efforts — his sexual comedy of manners Tomcat in Love and July, July, which centers on a high-school reunion of the Vietnam set — have not received the high praise of his earlier efforts. But OBrien has said he is not writing for the critics, noting that Moby Dick was loathed upon its release. I dont get too excited about bad reviews or good ones, he told Contemporary Literature in 1991. I feel happy if theyre good, feel sad if theyre bad, but the feelings disappear pretty quickly, because ultimately Im not writing for my contemporaries but for the ages, like every good writer should be. Youre writing for history, in the hope that your book — out of the thousands that are published each year — might be the last to be read a hundred years from now and enjoyed.

Good To Know

OBrien was stationed in the setting of the infamous My Lai massacre a year after it occurred. His father wrote personal accounts of World War II for The New York Times. OBriens book The Things They Carried was a contender as Washington D.C. looked in 2002 to find a book for its campaign to have the entire city simultaneously reading the same book.

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A few words about book author

Tim OBrien

In collections of short stories and essays — The Things They Carried and If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home — and in his novels — most notably, the National Book Award-winning Going After Cacciato — Tim OBrien has established himself as a startling and authoritative voice on one of the darkest chapters in American history — the Vietnam war.

Biography

Tim OBrien has said it was cowardice — not courage — that led him, in the late 1960s, to defer his admittance into Harvard in favor of combat in Vietnam. The alternatives of a flight to Canada or a moral stand in a U.S. jail were too unpopular. He has since explored the definitions of courage — moral, physical, political — in his fiction, a body of work that has, at least until recently, dealt almost exclusively with Americas most unpopular war and its domestic consequences. His first book, If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home looked at the war through a collection of war vignettes that he had written for newspapers in his home state of Minnesota, and his second book was a novel, Northern Lights, that he later decried as overly long and Hemingwayesque — almost a parody of the writers war stories. His third book, Going After Cacciato in 1978 does not suffer such criticism from the author. Or, for that matter, from the critics. Grace Paley praised the novel — which follows the journey of a soldier who goes AWOL from Vietnam and walks to Paris — as imaginative in The New York Times. And the book became a breakthrough critical success for OBrien, the start of a series that would give him the unofficial title as our pre-eminent Vietnam storyteller. Cacciato even won the prestigious National Book Award for fiction in 1979, beating out John Irvings The World According to Garp. Going After Cacciato taunts us with many faces and angles of vision, Catherine Calloway wrote in the 1990 book America Rediscovered: Critical Essays on Literature and Film of the Vietnam War. The protagonist Paul Berlin cannot distinguish between what is real and what is imagined in the war just as the reader cannot differentiate between what is real and what is imagined in the novel... Paul Berlin is forced, as is the reader, into an attempt to distinguish between illusion and reality and in doing so creates a continuous critical dialogue between himself and the world around him. Born in Austin, Minn., to an insurance salesman and schoolteacher, OBrien grew up as a voracious reader but didnt find the courage to write until his experiences in Vietnam. After the war, he studied at the Harvard Universitys School of Government and was a staff reporter at The Washington Post in the early 1970s. He writes from early in the morning until the evening and has a reputation for discarding long passages of writing because he finds the effort substandard. He also can do extensive revisions of his books between editions. His follow-up to Cacciato, 1981s The Nuclear Age, had a draft dodger find his fortune in the uranium business though he is consistently plagued by dreams of nuclear annihilation. Critics labeled it a misstep. But his subsequent effort, The Things They Carried, a collection of short stories about Vietnam, reaffirmed his reputation as a Vietnam observer. By moving beyond the horror of the fighting to examine with sensitivity and insight the nature of courage and fear, by questioning the role that imagination plays in helping to form our memories and our own versions of truth, he places The Things They Carried high up on the list of best fiction about any war, The New York Times said in March of 1990. And his next novel, In the Lake of the Woods, another Vietnam effort, won the top spot on Times roster of fiction for 1994. In Lake, Minnesota politician John Wade, whose career has suffered a major setback with the revelation of his participation in the notorious My Lai massacre from the Vietnam War, retreats to his cabin with wife Kathy, who later disappears. The Times Literary Supplement said it was perhaps his bleakest novel yet and that the most chilling passages are not those which deal with guns and gore in Vietnam but those set in Minnesota many years later, revealing a people at ease but never at peace. Pico Lyer, writing in Time, said OBrien manages what he does best, which is to find the boy scout in the foot soldier, and the foot soldier in every reader. OBriens more recent efforts — his sexual comedy of manners Tomcat in Love and July, July, which centers on a high-school reunion of the Vietnam set — have not received the high praise of his earlier efforts. But OBrien has said he is not writing for the critics, noting that Moby Dick was loathed upon its release. I dont get too excited about bad reviews or good ones, he told Contemporary Literature in 1991. I feel happy if theyre good, feel sad if theyre bad, but the feelings disappear pretty quickly, because ultimately Im not writing for my contemporaries but for the ages, like every good writer should be. Youre writing for history, in the hope that your book — out of the thousands that are published each year — might be the last to be read a hundred years from now and enjoyed.

Good To Know

OBrien was stationed in the setting of the infamous My Lai massacre a year after it occurred. His father wrote personal accounts of World War II for The New York Times. OBriens book The Things They Carried was a contender as Washington D.C. looked in 2002 to find a book for its campaign to have the entire city simultaneously reading the same book.

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